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Kim Allen Scott
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  • Bozeman, MT
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Kim Allen Scott's Discussions

Lincoln in the Bardo / by George Saunders
1 Reply

There are few American heroes as universally honored as Abraham Lincoln.  His masterful handling of the worst crisis this nation ever faced, along with his subsequent martyrdom, have over the decades…Continue

Started this discussion. Last reply by Karen Redlich May 31.

The Return of Little Big Man / by Thomas Berger

Sequels are rarely as good as the book that inspired them, but this one comes close.  Author Thomas Berger had to perform some situational gymnastics to explain why a continuation of Jack Crabb’s…Continue

Started Apr 25

Wanted! The Outlaw Lives of Billy the Kid and Ned Kelly / by Robert M. Utley

Historian Robert Utley has enjoyed a distinguished career as a historian with the United States National Park Service.  He has written on more than a few icons of American frontier history, including…Continue

Started Apr 3

The Family Law / by Benjamin Law

I had the pleasure of hearing Benjamin Law speak at a librarian’s conference in Sydney last December.  When he rose to give the opening speech, I really knew nothing about him or his work other than…Continue

Started Apr 3

 

Kim Allen Scott's Page

Latest Activity

Karen Redlich replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Lincoln in the Bardo / by George Saunders
"Thanks for the review, Kim. I have read some amazing things about this book, and would like to read it myself."
May 31
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Lincoln in the Bardo / by George Saunders

There are few American heroes as universally honored as Abraham Lincoln.  His masterful handling of the worst crisis this nation ever faced, along with his subsequent martyrdom, have over the decades lifted him beyond the status of a mortal to that of a demigod in the hearts of many.  This is particularly troublesome because such hagiography obscures the fact that Lincoln was a real person, with real pain and a real personality.  Many attempts to point out his feet of clay have fallen short,…See More
May 5
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

The Return of Little Big Man / by Thomas Berger

Sequels are rarely as good as the book that inspired them, but this one comes close.  Author Thomas Berger had to perform some situational gymnastics to explain why a continuation of Jack Crabb’s story was possible after the old frontiersman’s death ended the first volume, but once you get past that implausibility the story works pretty well.  After his escape from death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Crabb moves on to Deadwood, South Dakota to meet again with his old friend Wild Bill…See More
Apr 25
Kim Allen Scott posted discussions
Apr 3
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Eyrie / by Tim Winton

Tim Winton likes to write about broken people, which is another way of saying he just writes about people.  We are all damaged by the events of our lives, more or less, and the ways we deal with that damage make for really good storytelling.  In this novel, Tom Keely is a pill-popping, alcoholic former environmentalist who has withdrawn from the arena of public conflict in order to live in a fleabag high-rise apartment building.  A chance encounter with a girl from his childhood, Gemma, and her…See More
Mar 14
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Notes From a Small Island / by Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson is a very funny man, but he did not get that way without practice.  This early work (copyright 1995) is hardly as entertaining as some of his later books, but it is still well worth your time and shows the origins of the author's razor-sharp wit.  Bryson describes his adopted country during a farewell tour just prior to moving his family to the United States and leaves no opportunity unmet to describe Britain’s charm and its drawbacks.  I found it interesting to read this book after…See More
Mar 10
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

The Miner's Right / by Rolf Boldrewood

The Miner’s Right takes its title from the sometimes hated license issued to those gold seekers in Australia who had to pony up a pound a month for the right to dig for the metal.  Although that policy on the part of Victoria’s government resulted in a rebellion at Ballarat, this story takes place in the years following that tragedy and at the goldfields of New South Wales.  The hero of the tale is Hereward Pole, an English-born adventurer who, after winning the love of a beautiful Kentish…See More
Feb 25
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Plain Living: A Bush Idyll / by Rolf Boldrewood

They say Rolf Boldrewood’s other novels do not compare favorably with his Robbery Under Arms, and if this book is an example I can totally agree.  The plot is almost entirely absent in this story of a struggling sheep station owner, Harold Stamford, and his flawless family.  Stamford appears in the opening pages as a man on the brink of financial collapse as a drought threatens to kill his flocks and the bank forecloses on his mortgage.  We are introduced to his wife and adult children, all of…See More
Jan 27
Karen Redlich replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Robbery Under Arms / by Rolf Boldrewood
"Thanks for the review, Kim- this sounds really interesting. I have heard about Captain Marston but know very little about him, so I look forward to reading this one. Definitely sounds like the author wanted to warn us all against starting a career…"
Jan 25
Lindach replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Robbery Under Arms / by Rolf Boldrewood
"I look forward to your reviews on the other Rolf Boldrewood works. I feel guilty because as an Australian I should have read this famous book and also I haven't read any of his books!"
Jan 24
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Robbery Under Arms / by Rolf Boldrewood

If you haven’t read this Australian classic lately (or if you have never read it) do yourself a favor and pick up a copy.  Robbery Under Arms is a fantastic piece of fiction that boils all the bushranger legends of Ned Kelly, Ben Hall, “Mad Dog” Morgan, and Captain Moonlite into one sweeping narrative.  The language is a charming mixture of Dickensian and Australian English, and the pages come alive with stories that are both exciting and somewhat believable. ( I add the qualifier “somewhat”…See More
Jan 21
Lindach replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Ross Poldark / by Winston Graham
"I watched the first series and then started the books and had to read them all until I finished the series. I became a little obsessed with the story and watching all the characters and the storyline develop with the next generation. Ross…"
Jan 4
Karen Redlich replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Ross Poldark / by Winston Graham
"Hi Kim, I am inclined to agree with you, when I read Ross Poldark I felt that Ross was a very flat and 2 dimensional character whereas Demelza was the heart and soul of the piece. I didn't feel that Ross was truly devastated about losing…"
Jan 4
Kim Allen Scott posted a discussion

Ross Poldark / by Winston Graham

OK, I will admit it.  Often my reading habits are dictated by the television.  On one hand, I generally read more when there is nothing on television, making my practice of the all important consumption of print entirely dependent on the inanity of another form of media.  On the other hand, I sometimes choose to read a book solely because I enjoyed a representation of the story presented on television.  This latter practice is particularly nefarious because one already has a mental image of the…See More
Jan 4
Karen Redlich replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Outback / by Thomas Keneally
"Hi Kim, The Library will keep our eyes open for a newer edition of "Outback." I recently read a good spiel about Thomas Keneally here:       http://bit.ly/2aN6RHn Thanks for your review :-) Karen"
Aug 8, 2016
Karen Redlich replied to Kim Allen Scott's discussion Van Gogh: The Asylum Year / by Edwin Mullins
"Thanks Kim for your excellent review. I am going to read this as I really like Van Gogh's work but know so little about the man himself and what he went through. So few of us would associate "Starry Starry Night" with pain! Out of 5,…"
Aug 8, 2016

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Kim Allen Scott's Blog

A Tale of Two Cities / by Charles Dickens

It is somewhat bemusing to me that the book I decided to read on my long journey to Australia is one recommended by another American who has recently visited your shores.  Oprah Winfrey, a great advocate of reading, has picked two Charles Dickens classics to recommend to her admiring followers.  Although A Tale of Two Cities was one title she charged her book club members to read, I picked up a paperback edition at my library in blissful ignorance of Oprah’s endorsement.  My…

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Posted on February 7, 2011 at 11:30

Cloudstreet / by Tim Winton

This is another one of those books you describe with the hackneyed phrase, “I couldn’t put it down.” Although Cloudstreet and Tim Winton have been on the literary scene for some time now, this was my first introduction, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.



Cloudstreet follows the lives of two families, the Pickles and Lambs, as they share a dilapidated old mansion in postwar Perth. For the longest time I thought the oldest Pickles daughter, Rose, was the main character in the story, but as I… Continue

Posted on May 18, 2010 at 1:50

Comment Wall (1 comment)

At 10:08 on May 14, 2010, Jane B said…
Hi Kim - glad to have an international member of Mosman Readers!

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